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Workshop Time A Friday 1:15 – 2:45

Fireside Chat
An informal conversation with the morning’s keynote speakers
Mahmoud El-Kati and Nekima Levy Pounds Friday Keynote Speakers

Lethal Discrimination: The Death Penalty in the United States
The Advocates will discuss how pervasive racial discrimination in the U.S. death penalty system leads to the state-sponsored torture and killing of a disproportionate number of people of color. Participants will learn how to be effective advocates for the abolition of the death penalty.
Madeline Lohman, Program Associate, The Advocates for Human Rights
Slides and handouts for this workshop

Our Perspectives Count! An Action Plan for Change in the Classroom for Urban Learners
An interactive session focused on systemic educational practices that hinder urban learners. Participants from schools, families and communities design action plans that build on self-determination skills for urban learners. Moving beyond questioning “why intersectionality happens,” this workshop addresses new skills that help urban learners and lead to new educational narratives.
Yvonne RB-Banks, Ed.D, Professor of Education, Urban Teacher Program, Metropolitan State University

Drumming and Singing in Dakota Life: Past, Present and Future
In this workshop, you will learn about the role, significance and history of drumming and singing in Dakota life. You will leave with an understanding of the importance of passing Dakota drumming and singing on to current and future generations.
Virgil of Standing Bull Singers

Role of Culture and Breastfeeding in African American Women
This workshop will focus on the role of racism & its historical impact on breastfeeding rates as it relates to health disparities.
Dr. LaVonne Moore, DNP, CNM, IBCLC, Chosen Vessels Midwifery Services

Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Herstory
This session will focus on how AAPI women have influenced history, how their experiences shape our current reality, and examine current issues affecting AAPI women. Furthermore, this session will illustrate the importance of strengthening alternative narratives, NAPAWF’s advocacy work through storytelling, proactive movement building, racial equity, and racial realities.
Ariana Yang serves as the Events Planning Co-Chair for the NAPAWF Twin Cities chapter. She is a first-year doctoral student in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Minnesota. She received her BA from the University of Minnesota in 2013.
Sara Cronquist is an alumnus of the Minnesota Young Women’s Collaborative 2013-2014 Cohort and currently serves as the Director of Operations for the NAPAWF Twin Cities Chapter. In her work-life she serves as a research assistant for Innocent Technologies. She received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Minnesota in 2015.
Dr. Melissa Kwon is faculty for the Minnesota Young Women’s Collaborative at the University of Minnesota and Research Coordinator at NAPAWF. She is Co-Chair of the NAPAWF Twin Cities Chapter. She earned her BA from UC Berkeley and her MA and PhD from UC Santa Barbara.

Positive Interactions: Working Effectively with Muslim Clients & Colleagues
The Council on American-Islamic Relations, Minnesota (CAIR-MN) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. CAIR-MN works to enhancing the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding. Equip yourself with the tools needed to interact with Muslim clients and colleagues.
Amarita Singh, Civil Rights Director CAIR-MN
http://www.cair.com/publications/about-islam.html
http://www.cair.com/publications/guides-to-muslim-religious-practices.html
http://www.cair.com/publications/guides-and-toolkits.html

651 Youth for Justice: Using Youth Voice to Shape Equitable Programs
651 Youth for Justice strives to equip young people and youth workers with historical context and the skills they need to create change. Session includes
a look back at education’s effects on disenfranchised groups; participant story-sharing; and space to envision what individuals can do to bring change in school communities.
Julie Richards, 651 Youth for Justice; and youth co-presenter

Overcoming Racism in Rural Communities
Do you sometimes think that the approaches we are taught to address racism "just won't work" where you live? This interactive presentation will provide the opportunity for you to learn from others and share your own experience with what works and what doesn't in confronting racism in rural Minnesota.
Jerritt Johnston, Owner, True North Adventures

Leadership 101: Vigilance in Action
Video workshop invitation (23 sec)
What is in your hands to make a difference in the world? This workshop will provide you with the key leadership, social engineering, and public policy advocacy tools needed to advance racial justice.
Dr. Artika R. Tyner, Ed.D., M.P.P., J.D., Assistant Professor (Public Policy/Leadership)
University of St. Thomas, College of Education, Leadership & Counseling
Read a free chapter from Dr. Tyner's leadership book:
artikatyner.com/thelawyer-as-leader/
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Workshop Time B Friday 3:00 – 4:30

Undoing Racism: American Indian Movement Past Present and Future
Participants will learn about the history and accomplishments of American Indians in Minnesota and the world, and will learn about the effects of Indigenous mascots in sports on Native and non-Natives.
Clyde H. Bellecourt, Nee-Gon-Nway-Wee-Dung “Thunder Before the Storm”
Executive Director of the AIM Interpretive Center

History of Race in Education, Impacts on School Discipline and School Board Leadership, and MnEEP Tools for Race Equity in Education Action
This workshop will give a historical context for racism in U.S. education and its impact on school discipline and school board leadership. Participants will hear about Minnesota Education Equity Partnership’s “Solutions Not Suspensions” toolkit for districts and a MN School Board Pilot Institute around equity policy development.
Marika Pfefferkorn, Director of the Minnesota Black Male Achievement Network and Solutions Not Suspensions Campaign, Minnesota Education Equity Partnership
Jennifer Godinez, Project Director, Race Equity and Excellence in Education Network and Associate Executive Director, Minnesota Education Equity Partnership

How Cultural Teamwork Can Reduce MN Disparities
Participants will learn how to convert cultural and ethnic differences from sources of conflict to complementary assets. Explore new lens through which inter-ethnic and cultural relations can be perceived, and take away tools to develop new strategies and action steps.
Hector Garcia, Executive Director, Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs

Vigilance in the Pursuit of Justice and the Restoration of Community
This action-oriented workshop will provide participants with important environmental and historical perspectives about the nature of law enforcement and minority community relations. Participants will be invited into a circle process using restorative measures to identify issues of concern in law enforcement, and work towards collective value-driven and humane community goals.
Dr. Mary Clifford, Chair, Department of Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University
Dr. Raj Sethuraju, Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice.
Prof. Debra Leigh, co-founder and lead organizer of the Community Anti-Racism Education (CARE) Initiative, St. Cloud State University

Youth4Education: Isn’t it time you shared your voice?
Imagine a school where diverse youth have a voice in the classroom and challenges youth to look at the world outside of school. They investigate a community need, research the causes, and apply what they are learning to help resolve inequity in their schools and community. Join the National Youth Leadership Council’s #youth4ed in an engaging session to explore how youth as leaders can leave with an action plan to Serve. Learn. Change the World.
Fuchi Hang, Youth4Education Lead Activist, National Youth Leadership Council
Choua Her, Youth Leadership Specialist, National Youth Leadership Council

A Human Rights Approach to Racial Equity
Learn how a human rights approach can support anti-racism work by transforming organizational goals, strategies, and methods. Rights-based programming translates human rights principles into reality, combating inequality, exclusion, and powerlessness. Through theory, practice, and reflection, participants will be able to envision concrete steps for using human rights in their own work.
Madeline Lohman, Program Associate, The Advocates for Human Rights
Emily Farell, Program Associate, The Advocates for Human Rights
Workshop slides

Advancing Equity Across Systems
Advancing Equity Across Systems will arm participate with tools and skills for proactively making a difference in systems change and transformation in overcoming racism within systems and structures, progress towards equity needed in the different sectors, and build capacity and strength for effective achievements.
Dr. Jean Lee, President, Executive Director, Children's Hope International/R & R Family Ctrs, and APAHC - the Housing Consortium
Sue Watlov Phillips, Executive Director, MICAH, and Founder, Integrated Solutions

Staying Vigilant to the Goal of Anti-Racism
This workshop will describe ways Ramsey County Human Services is intentional in resisting racism in the organization. Systems and practices to address institutional racism and eliminate racial disparities in outcomes will be described. Participants will share/discuss how their organizations vigilantly combat racism using an authentic dialogue process.
Kathleen Ford, BSW, MOL - has been working for Ramsey County Human Services for over 14 years; the last 10 of those years as a Social Worker in Adult Services. She has been a member of the Anti-Racism Leadership Team (ARLT) for 4 years; also is an Authentic Dialogue Facilitator, and involved with other workgroups charged with completing Anti-Racism tasks. Kathleen received her Bachelor’s degree in Social Work from Metropolitan State University St. Paul and her Masters of Organizational Leadership from University of Northwestern St. Paul.
Nasir Mohamed - Nasir is a member of the Anti-Racism Leadership Team and works in Financial Assistance Services, Family Case Management - Foster Care, Adoption Assistance, Waivers.
Ovester Armstrong Jr., Mdiv, MSW, LGSW - Child Protection Specialist, member of the Anti-Racism Leadership Team.

Vigilance Demands Challenging the Narrative
When current news topics or personal interactions reinforce systemic and individual racism, do you recognize what's happening and how best to deal with it? In this workshop, learn to be vigilant about racialized incidences you encounter and effective ways to bring increased understanding by challenging the narrative.
Discussions that Encounter has been organizing twice-monthly programs that use presenters, videos, and other current events to enable facilitated, respectful conversation among people from all walks of life. Discussions that Encounter is organized by founder Rev. Dr. Arthur Agnew, Bill Keatts, Lou Schoen, and Rosalind Sampson.

Vigilance for Communities of Faith
The workshop is intended to support leadership from communities of faith by drawing upon the values and faith stance that give voice and power to remaining vigilant in antiracism work. Workshop participants will be provided a framework for engaging congregational participation and ownership in creating an antiracist identity.
Dr. Tim Johnson, Pastor, Cherokee Park United Church, Antiracism Team
Okogyeamon, PhD, Cherokee Park United Church, Antiracism Team

Nonprofit Trauma: Structural Racism in the field of Social Change
Social movements advance in part through nonprofits founded on social change and/or social service values. In these spaces we often experience workplace abuse and trauma because of structural racism. This workshop explores the history of racism and colonization in the nonprofit sector, and examines storytelling for individual and organizational healing.
Autumn Brown, Interim Executive Director, RECLAIM!; Project Leadership Team, Cultural Agility Collaboration of Minnesota Campus Compact; Board Member, The Common Fire Foundation

Watch Whiteness Work
We live within a system of white supremacy and no one is immune to its effects. Generally people are familiar with overt acts of racism, and unaware of the systemic characteristics that affect our everyday lives. This session will focus on recognizing and moving forward from internalized oppression and dominance.
Amber Buck, Associate Program Director, University of Minnesota
Rachael Mills, Assistance Resident Director, University of Minnesota

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Workshop Time C Saturday 12:30 – 2:00

Organizing Dilemmas on the Road to Freedom
This workshop uses storytelling, activities and discussion to explore dilemmas encountered in working for racial justice. We will break down the dynamic tensions between social structures and trauma; denial and truth-telling; separation and unity; self-expression and building power. We will also consider how to identify vulnerabilities in systems we oppose.
Ricardo Levins-Morales, trickster organizer and healer disguised as an artist. RLM Art Studio

Microaggressions: Did that just really happen?
Using the work of Dr. Derald Wing Sue’s book Microaggressions in Everyday Life: Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation, we will examine microaggressions, specifically their role in society and the effects they have on people. This will be a discussion of what steps we can take to understand and limit microaggressions in our own way of being as well as creating awareness of microaggressions with others. We will use case studies and lived experiences to engage in a meaningful dialogue.
Faustina Cuevas, Senior Academic Adviser, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Tracey Hammell, Senior Academic Adviser, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Cultural and Ethnic Communities Leadership Council – Promoting Policy and System Level Change Recommendations to Advance Equity at the Department of Human Services
Members of the Cultural and Ethnic Communities Leadership Council (CECLC) will share insights about their role working with the Department of Human Services (DHS). Members will discuss how participants can become engaged in the equity work of CECLC and how CECLC can serve as a vehicle and example for seeking improvements in the design and administration of public programs and influence systemic change.
Vayong Moua, MPA, Chair of Cultural and Ethnic Communities Leadership Council
Senior Advocacy and Health Equity Principal Center for Prevention, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota
2-3 Subcommittee Chairs for the Cultural and Ethnic Communities Leadership Council and Senior staff from DHS

Our Perspectives Count! An Action Plan for Change in the Classroom for Urban Learners (repeated)
An interactive session focused on systemic educational practices that hinder urban learners. Participants from schools, families and communities design action plans that build on self-determination skills for urban learners. Moving beyond questioning “why intersectionality happens,” this workshop addresses new skills that help urban learners and lead to new educational narratives.
Yvonne RB-Banks, Ed.D, Professor of Education, Urban Teacher Program, Metropolitan State University

In Equality Community Strategies for Healing and Justice
Vigilance: Seeing a history of trauma. The current model of police and courts: Does legitimacy exist? Engage in a poignant and timely question, watch, look, listen and participate as we present our brand of art and organizing to respond to a history of trauma and it’s current form: mass incarceration.
Damon Drake, Co-Founder In Equality
Thomas LaBlanc, Co-Founder In Equality
Laura LaBlanc, Co-Founder In Equality

Watch Whiteness Work (repeated)
We live within a system of white supremacy and no one is immune to its effects. Generally people are familiar with overt acts of racism, and unaware of the systemic characteristics that affect our everyday lives. This session will focus on recognizing and moving forward from internalized oppression and dominance.
Amber Buck, Associate Program Director, University of Minnesota
Rachael Mills, Assistance Resident Director, University of Minnesota

Restoring Relationship: Rebuilding the broken relationship between law enforcement and the community
This will be a solutions-oriented dialog, facilitated by community leaders Bill Woodson and Sgt. Melvin Carter. We will explore the issues of injuries and deaths of unarmed citizens as addressed by Black Lives Matter and other advocacy groups locally and nationally, and seek to identify how we can move forward to reduce these incidents through education and collective action.
Bill Woodson, Founder, Forward Motion Management Consulting, LLC
Woodson is an experienced corporate professional and academic administrator. He holds masters degrees in business administration and City and regional planning from the University of Michigan and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government; and is currently pursing doctoral studies in organizational leadership at the University of Minnesota.
Sgt. Melvin Carter (retired), Founder, Save Our Sons
Sgt. Carter is a retired beat cop, detective, police sergeant, public relations officer, and internal affairs inspector for the St. Paul Police Department; and the founder of Save our Sons, an organization dedicated to intervening in the lives of at-risk African American young men.

The Past Lives On: Historical Roots of Systemic Racism in American Education
This session will acquaint participants with the major—and often surprising—historical roots of systemic racism in American P-12 and higher education today. Attendees will participate in bringing these historical lessons home and in developing alternative narratives to discuss and address matters of educational equity today.
Sue K. Hammersmith, Ph.D. Past President, Metropolitan State University

Undoing Racism: American Indian Movement Past Present and Future (repeated)
Participants will learn about the history and accomplishments of American Indians in Minnesota and the world, and will learn about the effects of Indigenous mascots in sports on Native and non-Natives.
Clyde H. Bellecourt, Nee-Gon-Nway-Wee-Dung “Thunder Before the Storm”
Executive Director of the AIM Interpretive Center

Giving Up Me to Learn with You: The Need for Cultural Gifts in The Classroom
Our workshop will explore the importance of creating authentic integration (not forced assimilation) in the classroom, to repay the “education debt” we owe students whose cultural identity has been institutionally erased. This workshop will give an outlet for youth, educators and others to challenge the mindset internalized through colonized systems.
Cleveland Miller, s.t.a.r.t. and Opt Out
Keleenah Yang, KAYSC Saffiyah Alaziz, KAYSC Soline Van De Moortele, Students Stand Up and Speak Out for South High (SUSOSH), s.t.a.r.t., Gender Equity and the Silver Ribbon Campaign
Young adult coaches:
Mark Olivares
Milton Rosas-Cuellar
Cyarra Swanson

Strengthening alternative narratives through intergroup dialogue (IGD): Possibilities and challenges in current IGD practice
Intergroup dialogue (IGD) reduces prejudice, increases understanding of systemic intersectional oppression, and promotes social justice action. It is not “just talk”. Workshop participants will: a) learn IGD methods and current research; b) learn about local Minnesota IGD research and practice; and c) share their own IGD experiences and plans.
Nancy Rodenborg, Associate Professor of Social Work, Augsburg College
Vivian Jenkins Nelsen, Owner, The Hypatia Group, Inc.
Ted Page, Clinical Social Worker, Page Talk Therapy
Workshop slides

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Workshop Time D Saturday 2:15 – 3:45

Grounded Body, Open Heart, Critical Mind: A Recipe for Embodied Vigilance
Participants will gain a general understanding of the nexus of embodiment ideologies, compassion practices, and critical race approaches to racial justice. More specifically, participants will leave with a sense of how they can apply these three elements to their racial justice work and how this combination will support ongoing vigilance.
Heather W. Hackman, Founder and President of Hackman Consulting Group

YUIR (Youth Undoing Institutional Racism)
A shorter version of the Freedom School hosted by AFSC St. Paul semi-annually. In this workshop, people will better understand institutional racism, systems that perpetuate poverty, the criminal justice system, the link between racism/capitalism and how oppressed communities are shaped. Participants will learn ways to begin to be change agents.
American Friends Service Committee St. Paul Chapter's YUIR (Youth Undoing Institutional Racism)

Vigilance Within: Exploring Strategies Transforming Race Issues into Diversity and Multicultural Appreciation
This workshop presents suggested ways of working within the strengths of diversity and multicultural settings to overcome racial biases. Through group reflection and individual sharing, participants are invited to identify their own racial biases and come up with a workable ‘vigilance within’ goal in order to promote racial equity.
Digna Lipaod Adonis, PhD, Philippine Cordillera Community of Minnesota (PCCM) and Benguet Network of NGOs and POs (Benguet Net) - Philippines
Workshop slides

Race-Based Beliefs in Contemporary US Society – What Vigilance Requires
Racial narratives (stories, jokes, and media commentary) influence how people understand, give meaning to events happening about them, and are disposed to act toward them. Vigilance requires recognition of the narratives and the skills to interrupt, redirect and rebut them. Recognition. Skills. Practice.
Sue Hammersmith, PhD and Steven Martinez-Grande, MA (in progress), ASDIC Metamorphosis
Assisted by
Okogyeamon Phd and Margery Otto, JD, ASDIC Metamorphosis

White Followership for Racial Justice & Systemic Change - Centering People of Color in New Models for Cross-Racial Leadership
In this participant-centered, reflective and action-oriented workshop, we will offer a framework called white followership, centered on privileging experiences, sensibilities, needs and visions of communities of color in interracial organizing for racial justice, particularly within predominantly white campuses and surrounding white-controlled communities.
Lisa Albrecht, University of Minnesota, Social Justice Minor
Jesse Villalobos, Independent Scholar Activist, New York, New York

Sticks and Stones
“Sticks and Stones” was initially developed as a bullying workshop for elementary and middle school students.  This interactive workshop can help participants further understand how society influences our actions, how words, labels, and categories can influence our lives, and how we can be vigilant in overcoming racism, discrimination, and bigotry. 
Angela V. Earl, M.A, Arts and Cultural Management, Youth and Community Worker

The DiversityRUnity Process
The purpose of the session is to expose participants to the DiversityRUnity Process that entails formation work, prayer events, table discussions and group activities. Participants will be able to take it back to their own context to enable discussion and reconciliation among diverse individuals with a goal to be more unified, understanding and inclusive.
Rev. Pamela Fields, Circle of Love Faith Community
DiversityRUnity handouts

Building Bridges, Catalyzing Change
Being vigilant demands deeper understanding and bridge building across differences as tools of resistance and transformation. In this workshop, we will share our experiences doing racial equity work at the Blake School, and then, invite participant stories and strategies, exploring ways we can deepen understanding and collaborate for collective change.
David Boxer, Director of Information Support Services;
Raina Green, Middle School Social Studies Teacher;
J.J. Kahle, Upper School Spanish Teacher and GLBTQ Support & Advocacy;
Marie Michael, PK-12 Chair of Equity and Instruction;
Anna Reid, Upper School English Teacher
all at The Blake School

Sex Trafficking in the Native American Population - A Public Health Crisis 500 years in the Making
Participants will gain an understanding of the historical experience of oppression for Native Americans and how this experience and current racial oppression within systems set up to “help” have directly led to existing health disparities and experiences of increased vulnerability to exploitation.
Patina Park, Executive Director, Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center

Debunking the Model Minority Myth: The Facts about Asian American Students
Minnesota is home to some of the largest educational achievement gaps for many communities of color, including Asian Americans. Learn about issues that impact Asian American communities and walk away with specific data and tools to advocate for racial equity, debunk stereotypes, and build solidarity between communities of color.
Denise Hanh Huynh, Senior Fellow at Coalition of Asian American Leaders
Pa Thao, Institutional Research & Effectiveness Associate, Saint Olaf College

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